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authorSolomon Peachy <pizza@shaftnet.org>2020-07-15 19:40:55 -0400
committerSolomon Peachy <pizza@shaftnet.org>2020-07-24 21:20:13 +0000
commit092c340a2062fa98b7387fc5fd63578ddae7d0b6 (patch)
tree98ec96946eeb2ae709cb0528cc6998e21bb9b290 /docs
parent17f7cc92c258bc456a27c3e7c5a19c9409851879 (diff)
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[1/4] Remove SH support and all archos targets
This removes all code specific to SH targets Change-Id: I7980523785d2596e65c06430f4638eec74a06061
Diffstat (limited to 'docs')
-rw-r--r--docs/MAINTAINERS8
-rw-r--r--docs/PLUGIN_API88
-rw-r--r--docs/TECH203
3 files changed, 1 insertions, 298 deletions
diff --git a/docs/MAINTAINERS b/docs/MAINTAINERS
index 4928bb5a85..52ac7fb0db 100644
--- a/docs/MAINTAINERS
+++ b/docs/MAINTAINERS
@@ -25,13 +25,6 @@ NOTE: Port maintainers are simply developers who use a particular
target on a daily basis and are therefore able to report issues
specific to that target.
-:Archos Player/Studio: Jens Arnold
-:Archos Recorder v1: Jens Arnold
-:Archos Recorder 8MB:
-:Archos FM Recorder: Linus Nielsen Feltzing
-:Archos Recorder v2: Linus Nielsen Feltzing
-:Archos Ondio FM: Jens Arnold, Marianne Arnold
-:Archos Ondio SP:
:Creative Zen Vision:
:Creative Zen Vision:M: Maurus Cuelenaere
:Creative Zen Vision:M 60GB:
@@ -299,7 +292,6 @@ Build Tools
:rdf2binary:
:convbdf: Daniel Stenberg
:codepages:
-:player_unifont:
:uclpack:
:wavtrim: Linus Nielsen Feltzing
:voicefont:
diff --git a/docs/PLUGIN_API b/docs/PLUGIN_API
index 768342bd80..b2fb94ed7e 100644
--- a/docs/PLUGIN_API
+++ b/docs/PLUGIN_API
@@ -810,25 +810,6 @@ enum yesno_res gui_syncyesno_run(const struct text_message * main_message, const
\return
\description
-void i2c_begin(void)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC)) && ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \description
-
-void i2c_end(void)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC)) && ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \description
-
-int i2c_write(int address, const unsigned char* buf, int count )
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC)) && ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \param address
- \param buf
- \param count
- \return
- \description
-
void invalidate_icache(void)
\conditions (defined(CACHE_FUNCTIONS_AS_CALL))
\description
@@ -1433,56 +1414,6 @@ const unsigned long *rec_freq_sampr
\return
\description
-int mas_codec_readreg(int reg)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC)) && ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \param reg
- \return
- \description
-
-int mas_codec_writereg(int reg, unsigned int val)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC)) && ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \param reg
- \param val
- \return
- \description
-
-int mas_readmem(int bank, int addr, unsigned long* dest, int len)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC))
- \param bank
- \param addr
- \param dest
- \param len
- \return
- \description
-
-int mas_readreg(int reg)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC))
- \param reg
- \return
- \description
-
-int mas_writemem(int bank, int addr, const unsigned long* src, int len)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC))
- \param bank
- \param addr
- \param src
- \param len
- \return
- \description
-
-int mas_writereg(int reg, unsigned int val)
- \group MAS communication
- \conditions (!defined(SIMULATOR) && (CONFIG_CODEC != SWCODEC))
- \param reg
- \param val
- \return
- \description
-
void *memchr(const void *s1, int c, size_t n)
\group strings and memory
\param s1
@@ -1709,23 +1640,6 @@ void pcm_stop_recording(void)
\conditions (CONFIG_CODEC == SWCODEC) && (defined(HAVE_RECORDING))
\description
-bool peak_meter_get_use_dbfs(void)
- \conditions ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \return 1 if the meter currently is displaying dBfs values, 0 if the meter is displaying percent values
- \description
-
-unsigned short peak_meter_scale_value(unsigned short val, int meterwidth)
- \conditions ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \param val is the volume value (range: 0 <= val < MAX_PEAK)
- \param meterwidth is the width of the meter in pixel
- \return a value between 0 and meterwidth
- \description Scales a peak value as read from the MAS to the range of =meterwidth=. The scaling is performed according to the scaling method (dBfs / linear) and the range (peak_meter_range_min .. peak_meter_range_max).
-
-void peak_meter_set_use_dbfs(bool use)
- \conditions ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F))
- \param use If =use= is 0 use linear percent scale, else use dBfs
- \description Specifies whether the values displayed are scaled as dBfs or as linear percent values
-
int playlist_amount(void)
\group playback control
\return the number of tracks in current playlist
@@ -2208,7 +2122,7 @@ void sound_set(int setting, int value)
void sound_set_pitch(int pitch)
\group playback control
- \conditions ((CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3587F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == MAS3539F) || (CONFIG_CODEC == SWCODEC))
+ \conditions (CONFIG_CODEC == SWCODEC)
\param pitch
\description
diff --git a/docs/TECH b/docs/TECH
deleted file mode 100644
index 9ae71eec15..0000000000
--- a/docs/TECH
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,203 +0,0 @@
- Rockbox From A Technical Angle
- ==============================
-
-Background
-
- [Most, if not all, of this document is completely outdated. You should rather
- hunt down this info in the Rockbox wiki or source code!]
-
- Björn Stenberg started this venture back in the late year 2001. The first
- Rockbox code was committed to CVS end of March 2002. Rockbox 1.0 was
- released in June.
-
-Booting and (De)Scrambling
-
- The built-in firmware in the Archos Jukebox reads a file from disk into
- memory, descrambles it, verifies the checksum and then runs it as code. When
- we build Rockbox images, we scramble the result file to use the same kind of
- scrambling that the original Archos firmware uses so that it can be loaded
- by the built-in firmware.
-
- 1) The built-in firmware starts
- 2) It looks in the root directory for a file called "archos.mod" (player)
- or "ajbrec.ajz" (recorder)
- 3) If it finds one, it loads the file, descrambles it and runs it
-
-CPU
-
- The CPU in use is a SH7034 from Hitachi, running at 11.0592MHz (recorder)
- or 12MHz (player).
- Most single instructions are executed in 1 cycle. There is a 4KB internal RAM
- and a 2MB external RAM.
-
-Memory Usage
-
- All Archos Jukebox models have only 2MB RAM. The RAM is used for everything,
- including code, graphics and config. To be able to play as long as possible
- without having to load more data, the size of the mpeg playing buffer must
- remain as big as possible. Also, since we need to be able to do almost
- everything in Rockbox simultaneously, we use no dynamic memory allocation
- system at all. All sub-parts that needs memory must allocate their needs
- staticly. This puts a great responsibility on all coders.
-
-Playing MPEG
-
- The MPEG decoding is performed by an external circuit, MAS3507D (for the
- Player/Studio models) or MAS3587F (for the Recorder models).
-
- The CPU has a serial connection to the MAS for MP3 playback, using serial
- port 0 at approx. 1mbit/s. The MAS has a handshake signal called DEMAND,
- that informs the CPU when it wants more MP3 data. Whenever the DEMAND
- signal goes high, it wants data sent over the serial line, and it wants it
- quickly, within ~1ms. When the MAS has received enough data, it negates the
- DEMAND signal and expects the incoming data stream to stop within 1ms.
-
- The DEMAND signal is connected to a port pin on the CPU which can generate
- an IRQ, but only on the falling edge. That means that the mpeg driver code
-  must poll the DEMAND signal every ms to keep the MAS happy. The mpeg code
- does use the IRQ to detect the falling edge when the MAS is "full".
-
- Unfortunately, the serial port on the CPU sends the LSB first, and the MAS
- expects the MSB first. Therefore we have to revers the bit order in every
- byte in the loaded MP3 data. This is referred to as "bit swapping" in the
- Rockbox code.
-
- The internal DMA controller is used to feed the serial port with data. The
- driver works roughly like this:
-
- 1) Load MP3 data into the RAM buffer
- 2) Bitswap the data
- 3) Load the DMA source pointer to the next 64Kbyte block to be transferred
- 4) Wait until DEMAND is high
- 5) Enable the DMA
- 6) Wait until the falling DEMAND pin generates an IRQ
- 7) Disable the DMA
- 8) Go to 4
-
- The DMA generates an IRQ when the 64Kbyte block is transferred, and the
- IRQ handler updates the DMA source pointer.
-
-
- _____________________________
- | |
- DEMAND __________| |_____________
- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
- SC0 _____________/ \/ \/ \/ \/ \/ \/ \/ \/ \____________
- \_/\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/
- ^ ^
- | |
- Poll sees the DEMAND The DEMAND pin generates
- signal go high and an IRQ that in turn disables
- enables the DMA the DMA again
-
-Spinning The Disk Up/Down
-
- To save battery, the spinning of the harddrive must be kept at a minimum.
- Rockbox features a timeout, so that if no action has been performed within N
- seconds, the disk will spin-down automaticly. However, if the disk was used
- for mpeg-loading for music playback, the spin-down will be almost immediate
- as then there's no point in timing out. The N second timer is thus only used
- when the disk-activity is trigged by a user.
-
-FAT and Mounting
-
- Rockbox scans the partitions of the disk and tries to mount them as fat32
- filesystems at boot.
-
-Directory Buffer
-
- When using the "dir browser" in Rockbox to display a single directory, it
- loads all entries in the directory into memory first, then sorts them and
- presents them on screen. The buffer used for all file entries is limited to
- maximum 16K or 400 entries. If the file names are longish, the 16K will run
- out before 400 entries have been used.
-
- This rather limited buffer size is of course again related to the necessity
- to keep the footprint small to keep the mpeg buffer as large as possible.
-
-Playlist Concepts
-
- One of the most obvious limitations in the firmware Rockbox tries to
- outperform, was the way playlists were dealt with.
-
- When loading a playlist (which is a plain text file with file names
- separated by newlines), Rockbox will scan through the file and store indexes
- to all file names in an array. The array itself has a 10000-entry limit (for
- memory size reasons).
-
- To play a specific song from the playlist, Rockbox checks the index and then
- seeks to that position in the original file on disk and gets the file name
- from there. This way, very little memory is wasted and yet very large
- playlists are supported.
-
-Playing a Directory
-
- Playing a full directory is using the same technique as with playlists. The
- difference is that the playlist is not a file on disk, but is the directory
- buffer.
-
-Shuffle
-
- Since the playlist is a an array of indexes to where to read the file name,
- shuffle modifies the order of these indexes in the array. The algorithm is
- pretty much like shuffling a deck of cards, and it uses a pseudo random
- generator called the Mersenne Twister. The randomness is identical for the
- same random seed. This is the secret to good resume. Even when you've shut
- down your unit and re-starts it, using the same random seed as the previous
- time will give exactly the same random order.
-
-Saving Config Data
-
- The Player/Studio models have no battery-backuped memory while the Recorder
- models have 44 bytes battery-backuped.
-
- To save data to be persistent and around even after reboots, Rockbox uses
- harddisk sector 63, which is outside the FAT32 filesystem. (Recorder models
- also get some data stored in the battery-backuped area).
-
- The config is only saved when the disk is spinning. This is important to
- realize, as if you change a config setting and then immediately shuts your
- unit down, the new config is not saved.
-
- DEVELOPERS:
- The config checksum includes a header with a version number. This version
- number must be increased when the config structure becomes incompatible.
- This makes the checksum check fail, and the settings are reset to default
- values.
-
-Resume Explained
-
- ...
-
-Charging
-
- (Charging concerns Recorder models only, the other models have hardware-
- controlled charging that Rockbox can't affect.)
-
- ...
-
-Profiling
-
- Rockbox contains a profiling system which can be used to monitor call count
- and time in function for a specific set of functions on a single thread.
-
- To use this functionality:
- 1) Configure a developer build with profiling support.
- 2) Make sure that the functions of interest will be compiled with the
- PROFILE_OPTS added to their CFLAGS
- 3) On the same thread as these functions will be run, surround the relevent
- running time with calls to profile_thread and profstop. (For codecs,
- this can be done in the codec.c file for example)
- 4) Compile and run the code on the target, after the section to be profiled
- exits (when profstop is called) a profile.out file will be written to
- the player's root.
- 5) Use the tools/profile_reader/profile_reader.pl script to convert the
- profile.out into a human readable format. This script requires the
- relevent map files and object (or library) files created in the build.
- (ex: ./profile_reader.pl profile.out m68k-elf-objdump vorbis.map libtremor.a 0)
-
- There is also a profile_comparator.pl script which can compare two profile
- runs as output by the above script to show percent change from optimization
-
- profile_reader.pl requires a recent binutils that can automatically handle
- target object files, or objdump in path to be the target-objdump.