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authorMartin Arver <martin.arver@gmail.com>2006-10-17 09:31:18 +0000
committerMartin Arver <martin.arver@gmail.com>2006-10-17 09:31:18 +0000
commitb109969fcd955da2b0b98f302adf9365aaf91186 (patch)
tree5438b4a5217a6073f52fe1efef91bdab09e735ab /manual
parentd77ae1d5558ab20e4d8917d91618fad1743f22fa (diff)
downloadrockbox-b109969fcd955da2b0b98f302adf9365aaf91186.tar.gz
rockbox-b109969fcd955da2b0b98f302adf9365aaf91186.zip
Clean up, remove tab characters
git-svn-id: svn://svn.rockbox.org/rockbox/trunk@11242 a1c6a512-1295-4272-9138-f99709370657
Diffstat (limited to 'manual')
-rwxr-xr-xmanual/configure_rockbox/sound_settings.tex166
1 files changed, 84 insertions, 82 deletions
diff --git a/manual/configure_rockbox/sound_settings.tex b/manual/configure_rockbox/sound_settings.tex
index 31f3ce5adf..8d3a1ac464 100755
--- a/manual/configure_rockbox/sound_settings.tex
+++ b/manual/configure_rockbox/sound_settings.tex
@@ -7,9 +7,9 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
\section{Volume}
This setting adjusts the volume of your music. Like most professional
audio gear and many consumer audio products, Rockbox uses a decibel scale
- where 0 dB is a reference that indicates the maximum volume that the \dap\
- can produce without possible distortion (clipping). All values lower than this
- reference will be negative and yield a progressively softer volume.
+ where 0 dB is a reference that indicates the maximum volume that the \dap{}
+ can produce without possible distortion (clipping). All values lower than
+ this reference will be negative and yield a progressively softer volume.
\opt{player, recorder, recorderv2fm, ondio, ipodnano, ipodvideo}{
Values higher than 0 dB are available and can be used to raise the
volume more than would otherwise be possible. These volume levels will
@@ -86,9 +86,9 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
Karaoke
& Removes all sound that is the same in both channels. Since most
music is recorded with vocals being equally present in both channels
- to make the singer sound centrally placed, this often (but not always)
- has the effect of removing the voice track from a song. This setting
- also very often has other undesirable effects on the sound. \\
+ to make the singer sound centrally placed, this often (but not
+ always) has the effect of removing the voice track from a song. This
+ setting also very often has other undesirable effects on the sound. \\
\bottomrule
\end{tabularx}
\end{center}
@@ -97,12 +97,12 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
\section{Stereo Width}
Stereo width allows you to manually specify the effect that is applied
when the \setting{Channels} setting is set to \setting{Custom}.
- All values below 100\% will progressively mix the contents of one channel into
- the other. This has the effect of gradually centering the stereo image, until
- you have monophonic sound at 0\%. Values above 100\% will progressively remove
- components in one channel that is also present in the other. This has the
- effect of widening the stereo field. A value of 100\% will leave the stereo
- field unaltered.
+ All values below 100\% will progressively mix the contents of one channel
+ into the other. This has the effect of gradually centering the stereo image,
+ until you have monophonic sound at 0\%. Values above 100\% will progressively
+ remove components in one channel that is also present in the other. This has
+ the effect of widening the stereo field. A value of 100\% will leave the
+ stereo field unaltered.
\opt{recorder,recorderv2fm}{
\section{Loudness}
@@ -214,9 +214,9 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
versa in order to simulate the spatial cues that the ear and brain receive
when listening to a set of loudspeakers placed in front of the listener. The
result is a more natural stereo image that can be especially appreciated in
- older rock and jazz records, where one instrument is often hard-panned to just
- one of the speakers. Many people will find such records tiring to listen to
- using earphones and no crossfeed effect.
+ older rock and jazz records, where one instrument is often hard-panned to
+ just one of the speakers. Many people will find such records tiring to listen
+ to using earphones and no crossfeed effect.
Crossfeed has the following settings.
\begin{description}
@@ -234,7 +234,8 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
of both this setting and the \setting{Cross Gain} setting.
\item[High-Frequency Cutoff]
Decides at which frequency the cross path audio will start to be cut
- by the amount described by the \setting{High-Frequency Attenuation} setting.
+ by the amount described by the \setting{High-Frequency Attenuation}
+ setting.
\end{description}
Most users will find the default settings to yield satisfactory results, but
@@ -260,39 +261,39 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
\textbf{EQ Band(s)} & \textbf{Description} \\\midrule
Band 0: Low shelf filter
& A low shelf filter boosts or lowers all frequencies below the
- designated cutoff point. The ``bass''control on most home or car
- stereos is an example of a low shelf filter. The low shelf
- filter in Rockbox is more flexible than a simple ``bass''
- control, because a simple bass control only lets you adjust
- the amount of gain that is applied. Rockbox lets you control
- the amount of gain that is applied (i.e., the amount that the
- bass is boosted or cut) too, but Rockbox also allows you to
- adjust the ``cutoff'' frequency where the shelving starts to take
- effect. For example, a cutoff frequency of 50 Hz will adjust only very
- low frequencies. A cutoff frequency of 200 Hz, on the other hand, will
- adjust a much wider range of bass frequencies.. \\
+ designated cutoff point. The ``bass''control on most home or car
+ stereos is an example of a low shelf filter. The low shelf
+ filter in Rockbox is more flexible than a simple ``bass''
+ control, because a simple bass control only lets you adjust
+ the amount of gain that is applied. Rockbox lets you control
+ the amount of gain that is applied (i.e., the amount that the
+ bass is boosted or cut) too, but Rockbox also allows you to
+ adjust the ``cutoff'' frequency where the shelving starts to take
+ effect. For example, a cutoff frequency of 50 Hz will adjust only very
+ low frequencies. A cutoff frequency of 200 Hz, on the other hand, will
+ adjust a much wider range of bass frequencies.. \\
%
Bands 1-3: Peaking filters
- & Peaking EQ filters boost or low a center frequency that you select,
- as well as the frequencies within a certain distance of that
- center. Graphic equalizers in home stereos are usually peaking
- filters. The peaking EQs on Rockbox's parametric equalizer let
- you adjust three different parameters for each EQ band 1
- through 3. The ``center'' parameter controls the center
- frequency that is adjusted by that EQ band. The ``gain''
- parameter controls how much each band is adjusted. Positive
- numbers make the EQ band louder, while negative numbers make
- that EQ band quieter. Finally, the ``Q'' parameter controls how wide
- or narrow each EQ band is. Higher Q values will affect a
- narrow band of frequencies, while lower EQ values will affect
- a wider band of frequencies. \\
+ & Peaking EQ filters boost or low a center frequency that you select,
+ as well as the frequencies within a certain distance of that
+ center. Graphic equalizers in home stereos are usually peaking
+ filters. The peaking EQs on Rockbox's parametric equalizer let
+ you adjust three different parameters for each EQ band 1
+ through 3. The ``center'' parameter controls the center
+ frequency that is adjusted by that EQ band. The ``gain''
+ parameter controls how much each band is adjusted. Positive
+ numbers make the EQ band louder, while negative numbers make
+ that EQ band quieter. Finally, the ``Q'' parameter controls how wide
+ or narrow each EQ band is. Higher Q values will affect a
+ narrow band of frequencies, while lower EQ values will affect
+ a wider band of frequencies. \\
%
Band 4: Hi shelf filter
- & A high shelf filter boosts or lowers all frequencies above a
- designated cutoff point. The ``treble'' control on most home or car
- stereos is an example of a high shelf filter. The high shelf filter is
- adjusted the same way as the low shelf filter, except that it works on
- the high end of the frequency spectrum rather than the low end.\\
+ & A high shelf filter boosts or lowers all frequencies above a
+ designated cutoff point. The ``treble'' control on most home or car
+ stereos is an example of a high shelf filter. The high shelf filter is
+ adjusted the same way as the low shelf filter, except that it works on
+ the high end of the frequency spectrum rather than the low end.\\
\bottomrule
\end{tabularx}
\end{center}
@@ -306,9 +307,9 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
This option controls whether the EQ is on or off.
\item[Graphical EQ:]
- This option brings up a graphic EQ screen, which allows adjustment of each of
- the three parameters described above (gain, center frequency, and Q) for each
- of the five EQ bands.
+ This option brings up a graphic EQ screen, which allows adjustment of each of
+ the three parameters described above (gain, center frequency, and Q) for each
+ of the five EQ bands.
\begin{table}
\begin{btnmap}{}{}
@@ -327,58 +328,59 @@ change to customize your listening experience.
\opt{IRIVER_H100_PAD,IRIVER_H300_PAD,IAUDIO_X5_PAD}{\ButtonRight}
\opt{IPOD_4G_PAD,IPOD_3G_PAD,IPOD_VIDEO_PAD}{\ButtonRight}
& Moves to the next EQ band. \\
- %
+ %
\opt{IRIVER_H100_PAD,IRIVER_H300_PAD}{\ButtonSelect}
\opt{IAUDIO_X5_PAD,IPOD_4G_PAD,IPOD_3G_PAD,IPOD_VIDEO_PAD}{\ButtonSelect}
& Toggles the cursor among the three parameters (gain, center frequency,
- Q) for the selected EQ band.\\
- %
+ Q) for the selected EQ band.\\
+ %
\opt{IRIVER_H100_PAD,IRIVER_H300_PAD}{\ButtonMode}
\opt{IPOD_4G_PAD,IPOD_3G_PAD,IPOD_VIDEO_PAD}{\ButtonMenu}
- & Exits the graphic EQ screen.\\
+ & Exits the graphic EQ screen.\\
\end{btnmap}
\end{table}
\item[Pre-cut:]
If too much gain is added through the graphical EQ, your music may distort.
- The \setting{Precut} setting allows you to adjust the overall gain of the EQ.
+ The \setting{Precut} setting allows you to adjust the overall gain of the EQ.
+
If your music distorts when using the EQ, trying changing this setting to a
negative value.
- \item[Simple EQ:]
- This option provides an easier alternative for those who are daunted by all of
- the parameters that can be adjusted using the graphical EQ. With the
- \setting{Simple EQ}, the only parameter that can be adjusted is the gain.
+\item[Simple EQ:]
+This option provides an easier alternative for those who are daunted by all of
+the parameters that can be adjusted using the graphical EQ. With the
+\setting{Simple EQ}, the only parameter that can be adjusted is the gain.
+
+\item[Advanced EQ:]
+This submenu provides options for adjusting the same parameters as the
+\setting{Graphical EQ}. The only difference is that the parameters are
+adjusted through textual menus rather than through a graphic interface.
+
+\item[Save EQ Preset:]
+This option saves the current EQ configuration in a \fname{.cfg} file.
+
+\item[Browse EQ Presets:]
+This menu displays a list EQ presets, as well as any EQ configurations saved
+using the \setting{Save EQ Preset} option. Users unfamiliar with the
+operation of a parametric EQ may wish to use the presets instead of trying to
+configure the EQ, or use the presets for designing their own custom EQ
+settings.
- \item[Advanced EQ:]
- This submenu provides options for adjusting the same parameters as the
- \setting{Graphical EQ}. The only difference is that the parameters are
- adjusted through textual menus rather than through a graphic interface.
-
- \item[Save EQ Preset:]
- This option saves the current EQ configuration in a \fname{.cfg} file.
-
- \item[Browse EQ Presets:]
- This menu displays a list EQ presets, as well as any EQ configurations saved
- using the \setting{Save EQ Preset} option. Users unfamiliar with the
- operation of a parametric EQ may wish to use the presets instead of trying to
- configure the EQ, or use the presets for designing their own custom EQ
- settings.
-
\end{description}
}
\opt{ipodvideo}{
\section{Hardware EQ}
- This function controls the EQ that is built into the hardware of your
- \playerman{}. The hardware EQ functions similarly to the Graphical EQ in that
- it allows adjustmnet of several parameters. However, unlike the Graphical EQ,
- the Hardware EQ allows the user to choose from a limited number of settings
- for ``Center Frequency'' and ``Bandwidth'' (``Bandwidth'' in the Hardware EQ
- is similar to ``Q'' in the Graphical EQ).
-
- \note{While the \setting{Hardware EQ} menu shows Low Shelf, three peaking
- filters, and High Shelf, the peaking filters are not currently operational.}
-
+This function controls the EQ that is built into the hardware of your
+\playerman{}. The hardware EQ functions similarly to the Graphical EQ in that
+it allows adjustmnet of several parameters. However, unlike the Graphical EQ,
+the Hardware EQ allows the user to choose from a limited number of settings
+for ``Center Frequency'' and ``Bandwidth'' (``Bandwidth'' in the Hardware EQ
+is similar to ``Q'' in the Graphical EQ).
+
+\note{While the \setting{Hardware EQ} menu shows Low Shelf, three peaking
+filters, and High Shelf, the peaking filters are not currently operational.}
+
}