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-rw-r--r--docs/CREDITS1
-rw-r--r--manual/configure_rockbox/main.tex74
2 files changed, 47 insertions, 28 deletions
diff --git a/docs/CREDITS b/docs/CREDITS
index 6cae3fde44..4b3646ebf8 100644
--- a/docs/CREDITS
+++ b/docs/CREDITS
@@ -186,3 +186,4 @@ Eli Sherer
Fredrik Öhrn
Nicolas Pennequin
Ralf Herz
+Michael DiFebbo \ No newline at end of file
diff --git a/manual/configure_rockbox/main.tex b/manual/configure_rockbox/main.tex
index 72dede7ed7..7c3032e053 100644
--- a/manual/configure_rockbox/main.tex
+++ b/manual/configure_rockbox/main.tex
@@ -16,6 +16,7 @@ This menu offers a selection of sound properties you may change to improve your
\opt{ipodnano}{ Volume can be adjusted from a minimum of -72 dB to a maximum of +6 dB.}
\opt{ipodvideo}{ Volume can be adjusted from a minimum of -57 dB to a maximum of +6 dB.}
\opt{ipodcolor}{ Volume can be adjusted from a minimum of -?? dB to a maximum of +?? dB.}
+
\item \textbf{Bass}
\opt{player,recorder,recorderv2fm,ondio}{This emphasises or suppresses the lower (bass) sounds in the track. 0 means that bass sounds are unaltered (flat response).}
\opt{h1xx,h300}{The Bass setting can be used to increase (but not decrease) frequencies below 300Hz. Bass boost can be set from 0 to 24 dB in increments of 2 dB. A setting of 0 means that low frequencies are unaltered (flat response).}
@@ -27,9 +28,10 @@ This menu offers a selection of sound properties you may change to improve your
\item \textbf{Balance}
How much of the volume is generated by the left or right channel of the sound. The default, 0, means that the left and right outputs are equal in volume. Negative numbers increase the volume of the left channel relative to the right, positive numbers increase the volume of the right channel relative to the left.
\item \textbf{Channels}
-
- \opt{player,recorder,recorderv2fm,ondio}{
- This option controls the on{}-board mixing facilities of the \dap. A stereo audio signal consists of two channels, left and right. Available options are
+ A stereo audio signal consists of two channels, left and right. The channels function controls how much of the left channel signal is mixed into the right channel signal, and vice versa.
+ \opt{MASCODEC}{This option controls the on{}-board mixing facilities of the \dap.}
+ \opt{SWCODEC}{This option controls the mixing facilities of the \dap.} Available options are:
+
\begin{itemize}
\item \textbf{Mono Left: }Plays the left channel in both stereo channels.
\item \textbf{Mono Right:} Plays the right channel in both stereo channels.
@@ -47,8 +49,6 @@ This menu offers a selection of sound properties you may change to improve your
central, this often (but not always) has the effect of removing the
voice track from a song.
\end{itemize}
- }
- \opt{h1xx,h300,ipodnano,ipodcolor,ipodvideo}{TODO write for sw-platform}
\opt{recorder,recorderv2fm}{
\item \textbf{Loudness}
@@ -101,8 +101,26 @@ This menu offers a selection of sound properties you may change to improve your
\end{itemize}
}
-\end{itemize}
+ \opt{SWCODEC}{
+ \item \textbf{Crossfeed} Crossfeed attempts to make the experience of listening to music on headphones more similar to listening to stereo speakers. When you listen to music through speakers, your right ear hears sound from the left speaker and vice versa. However, the sound from the left speaker reaches your left ear slightly later than the sound from your right ear, and vice versa. Moreover, when listening to speakers, you hear the direct sound from the speakers, but you also hear reflections of that sound as the sound waves bounce off of walls, floors, ceilings, etc. These reflections reach your ears slightly after the direct sound.
+
+The human ear and brain are very good at interpreting the timing differences between direct sounds and reflected sounds and using that information to identify the direction that the sound is coming from. On the other hand, when listening to headphones, your ear hears only the direct sounds, and not reflections. Moreover, your left ear hears only the left channel and the right ear hears only the right channel. The result is that sound from headphones does not provide the same spatial cues to your ear and brain as speakers.
+
+The crossfeed function uses an algorithm to feed a delayed and filtered portion of the signal from the right channel into the left channel and vice versa in order to simulate the spatial cues that the ear and brain receive when listening to non-headphone sources. The result is a better stereo image.
+ }
+\opt{SWCODEC}{
+ \item \textbf{Equalizer} Rockbox features a parametric equalizer. As the name suggests, a parametric equalizer lets you control several different parameters for each band of the equalizer. Rockbox's parametric EQ is composed of five different EQ bands:
+ \begin{itemize}
+ \item \textbf{Band 0: Low shelf filter. }A low shelf filter boosts or lowers all frequencies below the designated cutoff point. The ``bass''control on most home or car stereos is an example of a low shelf filter. The low shelf filter in Rockbox is more flexible than a simple ``bass'' control, because a simple bass control only lets you adjust the amount of gain that is applied. Rockbox lets you control the amount of gain that is applied (i.e., the amount that the bass is boosted or cut) too, but Rockbox also allows you to adjust the ``cutoff'' frequency where the shelving starts to take effect. For example, a cutoff frequency of 50 Hz will adjust only very low frequencies. A cutoff frequency of 200 Hz, on the other hand, will adjust a much wider range of bass frequencies.
+ \item \textbf{Bands 1-3: Peaking filters.} Peaking EQ filters boost or low a center frequency that you select, as well as the frequencies within a certain distance of that center. Graphic equalizers in home stereos are usually peaking filters. The peaking EQs on Rockbox's parametric equalizer let you adjust three different parameters for each EQ band 1 through 3. The ``center'' parameter controls the center frequency that is adjusted by that EQ band. The ``gain'' parameter controls how much each band is adjusted. Positive numbers make the EQ band louder, while negative numbers make that EQ band quieter. Finally, the ``Q'' parameter controls how wide or narrow each EQ band is. Higher Q values will affect a narrow band of frequencies, while lower EQ values will affect a wider band of frequencies.
+ \item \textbf{Band 4: High shelf filter.} A high shelf filter boosts or lowers all frequencies above a designated cutoff point. The ``treble'' control on most home or car stereos is an example of a high shelf filter. The high shelf filter is adjusted the same way as the low shelf filter, except that it works on the high end of the frequency spectrum rather than the low end.
+ \end{itemize}
+
+So, as a general guide, EQ band 0 should be used for lows, EQ bands 1 through 3 should be used for mids, and EQ band 4 should be used for highs.
+
+You can find more information about setting the parametric equalizer and using equalizer presets in the Advanced Topics chapter of this manual.
+ }
\section{\label{ref:GeneralSettings}General Settings}
\begin{center}
@@ -110,13 +128,20 @@ This menu offers a selection of sound properties you may change to improve your
\end{center}
\subsection{\label{ref:PlaybackOptions}Playback Options}
-This menu is for configuring settings related to audio playback
+This menu is for configuring settings related to audio playback.
\begin{itemize}
\item \textbf{Shuffle}
Select shuffle ON/OFF. This alters how Rockbox will select which next song to play.
\item \textbf{Repeat}
- Repeat modes are Off/One/All. ``Off'' means no repeat. ``One'' means repeat one track over and over. ``All'' means repeat playlist/directory.
+ The ``Repeat'' setting is for configuring settings related to repeating of directories or playlists. Repeat modes are Off/One/All/Shuffle:
+ \begin{itemize}
+ \item \textbf{Off: }``Off'' means that the current directory or playlist will not repeat when it is finished. (Note: If you have the ``Auto change directory'' option set to ``Yes,'' Rockbox will move on to the next directory on your hard drive. If the ``Auto change directory'' option is set to ``No,'' playback will stop when the current directory or playlist is finished.)
+ \item\textbf{One: }``One'' means repeat one track over and over.
+ \item\textbf{All: } ``All'' means that the current directory or playlist will repeat when it is finished. (Note: this option does \textbf{not} shuffle all files on your \dap. Rockbox is playlist oriented. When you play a song, or a directory, or an album, Rockbox creates a playlist and plays it. Thus, to shuffle all songs on the player, you need to create a playlist of all songs on the player, and play that playlist with shuffle mode set to ``All.'')
+ \item\textbf{Shuffle: }``Shuffle'' means that when the current directory or playlist has finished playing, it will be shuffled and then repeated.
+ \end{itemize}
+
\item \textbf{Play Selected First}
This setting controls what happens when you press PLAY on a file in a directory and shuffle mode is on. If this setting is Yes, the file you selected will be played first. If this setting is No, a random file in the directory will be played first.
\item \textbf{Resume}
@@ -229,15 +254,6 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
\end{itemize}
}
-
- \opt{SWCODEC}{
- \item \textbf{Crossfeed}
-
- Crossfeed attempts to make the experience of listening to music on headphones more similar to listening to stereo speakers. When you listen to music through speakers, your right ear hears sound from the left speaker and vice versa. However, the sound from the left speaker reaches your left ear slightly later than the sound from your right ear, and vice versa. Moreover, when listening to speakers, you hear the direct sound from the speakers, but you also hear reflections of that sound as the sound waves bounce off of walls, floors, ceilings, etc. These reflections reach your ears slightly after the direct sound. The human ear and brain are very good at interpreting the timing differences between direct sounds and reflected sounds and using that information to identify the direction that the sound is coming from. On the other hand, when listening to headphones, your ear hears only the direct sounds, and not reflections. Moreover, your left ear hears only the left channel and the right ear hears only the right channel. The result is that sound from headphones does not provide the same spatial cues to your ear and brain as speakers.
-
- The crossfeed function uses an algorithm to feed a delayed and filtered portion of the signal from the right channel into the left channel and vice versa in order to simulate the spatial cues that the ear and brain receive when listening to non-headphone sources. The result is a better stereo image.
- }
-
\opt{recorder,recorderv2fm,ondio,h1xx,h300,ipodnano,ipodcolor,ipodvideo}{
\item \textbf{Peak Meter}
The peak meter can be configured with a number of parameters. (For a description of the peak meter see page \pageref{ref:Peakmeter}.)
@@ -246,11 +262,11 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
\item \textbf{Peak Release:}
This determines how fast the bar shrinks when the music becomes softer. Lower values make the peak meter look smoother.
\item \textbf{Peak Hold Time:}
- Specifies the time after which the peak indicator will reset. If you set this value e.g. to 5s then the peak indicator displays the loudest volume value that occurred within the last 5 seconds. Big values are good if you want to find the peak level of a song, which might be of interest when copying music from the jukebox via the analogue output to some other recording device.
+ Specifies the time after which the peak indicator will reset. If you set this value e.g. to 5s then the peak indicator displays the loudest volume value that occurred within the last 5 seconds. Big values are good if you want to find the peak level of a song, which might be of interest when copying music from the \dap via the analogue output to some other recording device.
\item \textbf{Clip Hold Time:}
How long the clipping indicator will be visible after clipping was detected
\item \textbf{Performance:}
- In high performance mode, the peak meter is updated as often as possible. This reduces the chance of missing a peak value, making the peak meter more precise. In energy save mode the peak meter is updated just often enough to look fluid. This reduces the load on the CPU and thus saves a little bit of energy. If you crave every second of runtime for your jukebox or simply use the peak meter as a screen effect, the use of energy save mode is recommended. If you want to use the peak meter as a measuring instrument you'll want to use high performance mode.
+ In high performance mode, the peak meter is updated as often as possible. This reduces the chance of missing a peak value, making the peak meter more precise. In energy save mode the peak meter is updated just often enough to look fluid. This reduces the load on the CPU and thus saves a little bit of energy. If you crave every second of runtime for your \dap or simply use the peak meter as a screen effect, the use of energy save mode is recommended. If you want to use the peak meter as a measuring instrument you'll want to use high performance mode.
\item \textbf{Scale:}
Select whether the peak meter displays linear or logarithmic values. In ``dB'' (decibel) scale the volume values are scaled logarithmically. This very similar to the perception of loudness. The volume meters of digital audio devices usually are scaled this way. If you are interested in the power level that is applied to your headphones you should choose ``linear'' display. Unfortunately this value doesn't have real units like volts or watts since that depends on the phones. So they can only be displayed as percentage values.
\item \textbf{Minimum and maximum range:}
@@ -275,7 +291,7 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
}
\opt{recorder}{
\item \textbf{Trickle Charge}
- The Jukebox cannot be turned off while the charger is connected.
+ The \dap cannot be turned off while the charger is connected.
Therefore, trickle charge is needed to keep the batteries full after
charging has completed. For more in depth information about charging
see Battery FAQ in your \textbf{/.rockbox/docs }directory.
@@ -309,11 +325,11 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
Rockbox can be configured to turn off power after the unit has been idle for a defined number of minutes. The unit is idle when playback is stopped or paused. It is not idle while the USB or charger is connected, or while recording.
\item \textbf{Sleep Timer}
- This option lets you power off your jukebox after playing for a given time. \opt{recorderv2fm}{This setting is reset on boot. Using this option disables the \textbf{Wake up alarm} (see below).}
+ This option lets you power off your \dap after playing for a given time. \opt{recorderv2fm}{This setting is reset on boot. Using this option disables the \textbf{Wake up alarm} (see below).}
\opt{recorderv2fm}{
\item \textbf{Wake up alarm (Recorder v2/FM only)}
- This option turns the Jukebox off and then starts it up again at the specified time. This is most useful when combined with the Resume setting in the Playback options set to ``Yes'', so that the Jukebox wakes up and immediately starts playing music. Use LEFT and RIGHT to adjust the minutes setting, UP and DOWN to adjust the HOURS. PLAY confirms the alarm and shuts your Jukebox down, and STOP cancels setting an alarm. If the Jukebox is turned on again before the alarm occurs the alarm will be canceled. Using this option disables the \textbf{Sleep Timer} (see above).
+ This option turns the \dap off and then starts it up again at the specified time. This is most useful when combined with the Resume setting in the Playback options set to ``Yes'', so that the \dap wakes up and immediately starts playing music. Use LEFT and RIGHT to adjust the minutes setting, UP and DOWN to adjust the HOURS. PLAY confirms the alarm and shuts your \dap down, and STOP cancels setting an alarm. If the \dap is turned on again before the alarm occurs the alarm will be canceled. Using this option disables the \textbf{Sleep Timer} (see above).
}
\item \textbf{Limits}
@@ -335,17 +351,17 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
When the external power off condition is detected, the Car Adapter Mode function only pauses the playback. In order to shut down the \dap completely the \textbf{Idle Poweroff} function (see above) must also be set.
- If power to the DC in jack is turned back on before the \textbf{Idle Poweroff} function has shut the Jukebox off, playback will be resumed 5 seconds after the power is applied. This delay is to allow for the time while the car engine is being started. Once the Jukebox is shut off either manually, or automatically with the \textbf{Idle Poweroff}function, it must be powered up manually to resume playback.
+ If power to the DC in jack is turned back on before the \textbf{Idle Poweroff} function has shut the \dap off, playback will be resumed 5 seconds after the power is applied. This delay is to allow for the time while the car engine is being started. Once the \dap is shut off either manually, or automatically with the \textbf{Idle Poweroff}function, it must be powered up manually to resume playback.
}
\opt{player}{
\item \textbf{Line In (Player only)}
- This option activates the line in port on Jukebox Player, which is off by default.
+ This option activates the line in port on \dap Player, which is off by default.
This is useful for such applications as:
\begin{itemize}
- \item Game boy {}-{\textgreater} Jukebox {}-{\textgreater} human
- \item laptop {}-{\textgreater} Jukebox {}-{\textgreater}human
- \item LAN party computer {}-{\textgreater} Jukebox {}-{\textgreater} human
+ \item Game boy {}-{\textgreater} \dap {}-{\textgreater} human
+ \item laptop {}-{\textgreater} \dap {}-{\textgreater}human
+ \item LAN party computer {}-{\textgreater} \dap {}-{\textgreater} human
\end{itemize}
}
@@ -379,7 +395,8 @@ This menu deals with options relating to how the file browser displays files
\subsection{\label{ref:Language}Language}
This setting controls the language of the Rockbox user interface. Selecting a language will activate it. The language files must be in the \textbf{/.rockbox/lang/} directory. See page \pageref{ref:Loadinglanguages} for further details about languages.
-\subsection{\label{ref:Voiceconfiguration}Voice}
+\subsection{Voice}
+
\begin{itemize}
\item \textbf{Voice Menus}
This option turns on the Voice User Interface, which will read out menu items and settings as they are selected by the cursor. In order for this to work, a voice file must be present in the \textbf{/.rockbox/lang/} directory on the \dap. Voice files are large (1.5MB) and are not shipped with Rockbox by default.
@@ -411,3 +428,4 @@ This setting controls the language of the Rockbox user interface. Selecting a l
\end{itemize}
%\end{itemize}
See \url{http://www.rockbox.org/twiki/bin/view/Main/VoiceHowto} for more details on configuring speech support in Rockbox.
+